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Benefits of Waterless, Greaseless Cooking with vegetable time chart

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For your good health, it's reassuring to know that all vegetables have a built-in natural supply of vital vitamins,minerals and digestive enzymes. Unfortunately, all the essential health­ giving properties(dearly paid for at the supermarket) may quickly vanish in your kitchen. It can easily happen with old-fashioned cooking methods that require peeling and boiling, not to mention the health problems stemming from the need to use high-calorie fats and oils when sautéing.

No Need to Peel

With waterless, greaseless cooking,delicious vegetables can be prepared without sacrificing the wonders of nature.The first major breakthrough of this unique cooking method eliminates the need to strip away the flavor- and nutrient-rich skin. Peeling strips away natural vitamins and minerals located directly under the skin. For most vegetables, a gentle scrub is all that's needed before cooking. One more step to ensure that all of nature's goodness arrives "garden fresh" at your table.

Lower Heat

The second major break through of the waterless, greaseless, induction cooking method eliminates the devastating damages caused by high-heat oil sautéing and boiling of vegetables. High heat destroys most of the health-giving, water-and fat-soluble minerals, along with the very delicate flavors and colors. The vegetable's most valuable nutritional advantages are often thrown out with the cooking oil or water.

With waterless, greaseless "flavor-sealing" covered utensils and full-body induction construction, vegetables can be cooked with low heat,eliminating the need for boiling in water and sautéing in oil.With low heat, the vegetables are cooked "waterless" quickly and evenly in a vacuum below the boiling temperature, or "greaseless"without oil, and prepared in their own natural moisture. Using the vegetable's natural juices eliminates the need to add water or oil during cooking.

Less Oxidation

The third major breakthrough of waterless cooking is the elimination of harmful oxidation. Detrimental oxidation occurs when vegetables are boiled in un covered utensils,pressure-cooked or microwaved, allowing a good share of the health-giving properties to evaporate.

The waterless feature of our full-body induction cookware, with its unique vapor-sealing covers, locks vitamins, minerals and enzymes in the utensil. No steam is allowed to escape. Wonderful aromas remain inside the pan. Until the cover is removed, you won't know if its broccoli or cabbage being prepared. The vegetables cook on low heat, cooking evenly in their natural moisture.

Cooking Vegetables the Waterless, Greaseless Way

Scrub Root Vegetables

To clean root vegetables, scrub vigorously with a vegetable brush under cold running water and remove any surface blemishes with a paring knife. Do not peel.

Refresh Vegetables

All fresh vegetables, especially root vegetables, have a tendency to lose some of their natural moisture after harvesting. To add back some of the lost moisture, place the vegetables in the pan, fill the pan with water, add 1 tablespoon white distilled vinegar and soak for 10 to 15 minutes. Soaking also removes chemical sprays,preservatives and any other substances the vegetable may have come in contact with in transit and in storage. Pour the water off, rinse and cook according to the recipe.

Use the Right-Size Pan

When cooking vegetables the waterless way, it's very important to use a pan that the vegetables nearly fill. This is an essential step in forming the vapor seal, and even more important when cooking on an induction cook-top. The less vegetables in the pan, the more air, which can cause oxidation. In addition to oxidation, less-full pans will require a higher temperature setting to create a vapor seal, and more than likely, the vegetables will be scorched or burned.

Form the Vapor Seal

As the moist air inside the pan is heated, it expands and is forced out between the rim and the cover of the pan. Around the rim is a well, or reservoir, that collects the moisture. The covers are angled down to fit perfectly in line with the well. As the heated air continues to escape, the well is filled with moisture, forming the vapor seal. This usually takes 3 minutes or less on an induction cook-top and up to 5 minutes on a gas or electric range.

Find the Right Temperature Setting

Whether you have an electric range with glass top, European or conventional burners, a conventional or commercial gas range, or an induction cook-top waterless cookware takes all the guesswork out of cooking the waterless way.

Here are some simple tips:

  • If the rim or well spits moisture, the temperature is too high.
  • If the lid does not spin freely on a cushion of water after forming the seal, the temperature is too low.

Once you discover the proper setting, cooking the waterless way will be simple and easy. If you have a commercial gas range and you cannot achieve sufficient low temperatures for cooking vegetables the waterless, greaseless way, use a carbon steel trivet or flame tamer placed over the burner. You can also call your dealer and ask that they replace your commercial gas burners with those specifically and safely designed for the home kitchen.

Reestablish the Vapor Seal

During the waterless cooking process, don't peek. Removing the cover will destroy the vapor seal, lengthen the cooking time and may cause the vegetables to burn. If you or another member of the family does lift the lid, cover the pan, close the vent and add 2 tablespoons water to the rim to reestablish the vapor seal. Add 3 to 5 minutes to the prescribed cooking time.

Cooking Fresh Vegetables

To cook, place the vegetables in a pan that they nearly fill. Rinse with cold water and pour the water off.The water that clings to the vegetables and its own natural moisture are sufficient for cooking the waterless way.

     Cover the pan,close the vent and cook over medium heat (Settings 3 or 4 - 210˚F to 240˚F). When steam escapes and the cover spins freely on a cushion of water, the vapor seal is formed, 3 to 5 minutes, or less when induction cooking. After forming the seal, reduce to low or medium-low heat (Settings 2 or 3 - 180˚F to 210˚F). Cook according to the time chart.Don't peek.Removing the cover will destroy the vapor seal,lengthen the cooking time and may cause the vegetables to burn.If at first you are concerned about cooking with­out water, add 2 or 3 tablespoons of water to the pan after rinsing and cook as directed. As your confidence builds, you can lessen the amount of water used.

     When finished cooking, test for doneness with a fork. If not done, cover the pan, close the vent and add 2 tablespoons of water to the rim to reestablish the vapor seal. Cook over low heat for 5 to 10 minutes.

Cooking Frozen Vegetables

Do not defrost. Place the frozen vegetables in the pan they most nearly fill. Rinse with cold water and pour the water off.The water that clings to the vegetable and its own natural moisture are sufficient for cooking the waterless way.

     Cover the pan,close the vent and cook over medium heat (Settings 3 or 4 - 210˚F to 240˚F). When steam escapes and the cover spins freely on a cushion of water, the vapor seal is formed, 3 to 5 minutes, or less when induction cooking. After forming the seal, reduce to low or medium-low heat (Settings 2 or 3 - 180˚F to 210˚F). Cook according to the time chart. Don't peek. Removing the cover will destroy the vapor seal, lengthen the cooking time and may cause the vegetables to burn.

Cooking for One or Two

When cooking for one or two people,naturally the quantity of vegetables will be less. However,with waterless cooking more than one vegetable can be cooked in the same pan with no interchanging of flavors or colors. You can cook potatoes, sliced carrots and broccoli all in the same pan the waterless way. For example,using a 1 or 1.25-quart covered saucepan, place the potatoes in the pan, halved or whole, with the skin side to the surface of the pan, add two sliced carrots and top with the broccoli florets. Rinse the vegetables and pour the water off. Cook as directed above.

VEGETABLE COOKING TIME IN MINUTES*
Less for Induction - More for Electric and Gas
Apples 10 to 15
Artichoke (whole) 30 to 45
Artichoke hearts 10 to 15
Asparagus 10 to 15
Beans, green (fresh, cut) 15 to 20
Beans, green (fresh, French cut) 10 to 15
Beans, green (frozen) 10 to 12
Beans, lima (fresh) 30 to 35
Beans, lima (frozen) 10 to 12
Beets (whole) 35 to 40
Broccoli 15 to 20
Brussels sprouts 15 to 20
Cabbage, shredded 10 to 15
Carrots, sliced 15 to 20
Cauliflower 10 to 15
Corn (fresh) 15 to 20
Corn (frozen) 10 to 12
Eggplant 5 to 8
Greens 10 to 12
Leeks 12 to 15
Mushrooms 5 to 10
Okra 15 to 20
Onions (whole) 15 to 20
Parsnips (sliced) 15 to 20
Peas (frozen) 5 to 7
Potatoes (quartered) 20 to 25
Potatoes (whole) 30 to 35
Potatoes (sweet) 30 to 35
Spinach (fresh) 15 to 20
Spinach (frozen) 8 to 10
Squash, summer (yellow) 15 to 20
Squash, winter 25 to 30
Squash, zucchini 20 to 25
Tomatoes 10 to 15
Turnips and rutabagas 25 to 30

*After forming the vapor seal, which take 3 to 5 minutes.

NOTE: To keep your vegetables hot and ready to serve, keep the cover on and the vent closed. The vegetables will stay hot in the pan for 20 to 25 minutes.

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